Pacifico Yokohama Floorplan

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This meeting took place in 2017


Here are the related meetings in 2018:
Aging, Inflammation and Immunity (X2)
Pushing the Limits of Healthspan and Longevity (D3)

For a complete list of the meetings for the upcoming/current season, see our meeting list, or search for a meeting.

Aging and Mechanisms of Aging-Related Disease (E2)


Organizer(s) Kazuo Tsubota, Shin-ichiro Imai, Matt Kaeberlein and Joan Mannick
May 15—19, 2017
Pacifico Yokohama • Yokohama, Japan
Discounted Abstract Deadline: Jan 17, 2017
Abstract Deadline: Feb 15, 2017
Scholarship Deadline: Jan 17, 2017
Discounted Registration Deadline: Mar 15, 2017

Sponsored by Astellas Pharma Inc., Journal of Molecular Cell Biology (JMCB) and Nestlé Institute of Health Sciences. Special scholarship support provided by the Japanese Society of Anti-Aging Medicine.

Summary of Meeting:
Populations are aging rapidly worldwide, particularly in Asia, driving a strong interest in aging/longevity research. This Keystone Symposia meeting will capture the cutting-edge front of this exciting field of science, covering essential aspects of aging/longevity research, including critical signaling pathways and regulators, inter-tissue communication, stem cells, stress and damage responses, cellular senescence, physiological rhythms, human genetics and mental well-being (happiness). Because aging is a systemic phenomenon, it is important to address various layers of the aging/longevity-controlling hierarchy, particularly focusing on metabolic regulation, including mitochondria, NAD+, oxidative stress, inflammation, protein homeostasis, autophagy and many other age-associated pathophysiologies. The outcome of these studies needs to be translated to resolve social and economic issues caused by rapidly aging societies. Novel therapeutic and preventive interventions have been explored and developed as a growing attempt to meet the unmet needs of our aging societies, and these new aspects of aging/longevity research and the gaps in knowledge between the basic science and practical applications will also be covered in the meeting. There is a growing body of evidence that our modern lifestyle, such as the heavy use of blue light in smart phones and tablet computers, affects physiological rhythms and metabolism, promoting age-associated diseases such as obesity, diabetes, cancer and depression. Therefore, it is now time to think differently about what we can do to deal with all these problems in light of recent progress in this exciting field of science.

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No registration fees are used to fund entertainment or alcohol at this conference

Conference Program    Print  |   View meeting in 24 hr (international) time


The meeting will begin on Monday, May 15 with registration from 16:00 to 20:00 and a welcome mixer from 18:00 to 20:00. Conference events conclude on Friday, May 19 with a closing plenary session from 16:30 to 18:45, followed by a social hour and entertainment. We recommend return travel on Saturday, May 20 in order to fully experience the meeting.

MONDAY, MAY 15

4:00—8:00 PM
Arrival and Registration

Foyer
6:00—8:00 PM
Welcome Mixer
No registration fees are used to fund alcohol served at this function.

Foyer

TUESDAY, MAY 16

7:30—8:30 AM
Breakfast

Individual Hotel
8:30—9:30 AM
Welcome and Keynote Address
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Room 501+502
* Joan Mannick, resTORbio, USA

Johan Auwerx, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne – EPFL, Switzerland
Cross-species Genetic Mapping of Targets in Mitochondria, Metabolism and Aging

9:30 AM—12:00 PM
Signal Transduction I – Evolutionarily Conserved Players
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Room 501+502
* Shin-ichiro Imai, Washington University School of Medicine, USA

Leonard P. Guarente, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
The Role of Sirtuins in Aging and Age-Associated Diseases

Coffee Break

Joan Mannick, resTORbio, USA
Is mTOR an Evolutionarily Conserved Pathway that Regulates Aging?

Noboru Mizushima, University of Tokyo, Japan
Autophagy in Intracellular Quality Control

Motoshi Hayano, Harvard Medical School, USA
Short Talk: Do Epigenetic Changes Cause Aging in Animals?

Louis R. Lapierre, Brown University, USA
Short Talk: Blocking Lipid Secretion Promotes Lipophagy and Longevity

12:00—2:00 PM
On Own for Lunch

12:00—1:00 PM
Poster Setup

Room 503
1:00—10:00 PM
Poster Viewing

Room 503
2:00—4:00 PM
Workshop 1: Cutting-Edge Front of Aging/Longevity Science

Room 501+502
* Kazuo Tsubota, Keio University School of Medicine, Japan

Naoko Ohtani, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan
Gut Microbiota Promotes Obesity-Associated Liver Cancer through PGE2-Mediated Suppression of Antitumor Immunity

Mark S. Lucanic, Buck Institute for Research on Aging, USA
Caenorhabditis Intervention Testing Program: Screening Pro-Longevity Chemicals for Reproducible and Robust Positive Effects across Diverse Genetic Backgrounds

Shuhei Nakamura, Osaka University, Japan
Rubicon Regulates Lifespan via Modulating Autophagy Activity

Kazuto Kawamura, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, Japan
Forward Genetic Screen for Adult-Onset Motor Deficits in C. elegans

Alaattin Kaya, Harvard Medical School, USA
Molecular Basis of Longevity Traits in Yeast Lifespan

Hiromi Rakugi, Osaka University, Japan
From Bench to Society in Geriatric Medicine

Hiroshi Itoh, Keio University School of Medicine, Japan
Application of NMN (Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) to Anti-Aging in Humans

4:00—4:30 PM
Coffee Available

Foyer
4:30—7:00 PM
Signal Transduction II – Mitochondria
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Room 501+502
* Ana Maria Cuervo, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, USA

Marcia C. Haigis, Harvard Medical School, USA
The Function of Mitochondrial Sirtuins in Metabolism and Aging

Matt Kaeberlein, University of Washington, USA
The Importance of mTOR Signaling in Aging and Longevity Control

Michael Ristow, ETH Zürich, Switzerland
Mitochondrial Control of Healthy Aging

Takashi Kadowaki, University of Tokyo, Japan
Adiponectin as an Anti-Aging Regulation

Nicholas L. Bentley, University of New South Wales, Australia
Short Talk: Elevating Mitochondrial NAD Biosynthesis Enhances Hepatic Energy Metabolism, and Improves Glucose Tolerance in Aged Mice

7:00—8:00 PM
Social Hour with Lite Bites

Room 503
7:00—9:00 PM
Poster Session 1

Room 503

WEDNESDAY, MAY 17

7:30—8:30 AM
Breakfast

Individual Hotel
8:30—11:30 AM
Stem Cell Aging and Humoral Factors
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Room 501+502
* Thomas A. Rando, Stanford University School of Medicine, USA

Heinrich Jasper, Buck Institute for Research on Aging, USA
Inflammation and Immune Modulation: Tackling Age-related Stem Cell Dysfunction

Rajendra S. Apte, Washington University School of Medicine, USA
Photoreceptor Metabolism in the Aging Eye

Coffee Break

Emi K. Nishimura, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan
Stem Cells Orchestrate Hair Follicle Aging Program

Tapash Jay Sarkar, Stanford University, USA
Short Talk: Scalable Rejuvenation through Transient Reprogramming

Yaisa Andrews-Zwilling, SanBio, Inc., USA
Short Talk: Transplanted Modified Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells, SB623, Ameliorate Chronic Behavioral and Pathological Deficits in Stroke Rats

11:30 AM—2:00 PM
On Own for Lunch

11:30 AM—1:00 PM
Poster Setup

Room 503
1:00—10:00 PM
Poster Viewing

Room 503
2:00—4:00 PM
Workshop 2: Mitochondria and NAD Metabolism

Room 501+502
* Johan Auwerx, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne – EPFL, Switzerland

Mitsukuni Yoshida, Washington University in St. Louis, USA
eNAMPT as an Adipose-Derived NAD+ Biosynthetic Enzyme that Systemically Regulates Aging

Emi Inagaki, Keio University, Japan
NAD-Related Metabolites and their Possible Application for Corneal Disease

Anthony Joseph Covarrubias, Buck Institute, USA
The Role of Macrophages in NAD+ Homeostasis during Aging

Masakatsu Yamashita, Ehime University School of Medicine, Japan
Metabolic Regulation of T Cell Senescence by Menin

Pénélope Andreux, Amazentis, Switzerland
Translation of Urolithin A Effects on Mitochondria and Muscle from Worms to Rodents to Humans

Caroline C. Escoubas, Harvard School of Public Health, USA
The Role of Mitochondrial Dynamics in AMPK-Mediated Learning and Memory

4:00—4:30 PM
Coffee Available

Foyer
4:30—6:30 PM
Intertissue Communication and Rhythm
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Room 501+502
* Matt Kaeberlein, University of Washington, USA

Shin-ichiro Imai, Washington University School of Medicine, USA
Nicotinamide Mononucleotide, a Key Systemic NAD+ Intermediate in Mammalian Aging and Longevity Control

Satchidananda Panda, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, USA
Circadian Regulation for the Prevention and Treatment of Metabolic Diseases

Francisca O. Peixoto, IRB Barcelona, Spain
Short Talk: Aged Stem Cells Reprogram their Daily Rhythmic Functions to Adapt to Tissue-Specific Stress

Victoria A. Acosta Rodriguez, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, USA
Short Talk: Calorically Restricted Mice Self-Impose a Temporal Pattern of Food Intake

6:30—7:30 PM
Social Hour with Lite Bites

Room 503
7:00—9:00 PM
Poster Session 2

Room 503

THURSDAY, MAY 18

7:30—8:30 AM
Breakfast

Individual Hotel
8:30—11:30 AM
Cellular Senescence
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Room 501+502
* Eisuke Nishida, Kyoto University, Japan

John Sedivy, Brown University, USA
Activation of Somatic Retrotransposition in Cellular Senescence and Aging

Jan M. van Deursen, Mayo Clinic, USA
How Senescent Cells Contribute to Aging and Disease

Coffee Break

Tohru Minamino, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Japan
Cellular Senescence and Age-Associated Diseases

Yun-Chen Chiang, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA
Short Talk: The Role of p16INK4a in Shaping the T Cell Receptor Repertoire Diversity

Kyoko Miura, Hokkaido University, Japan
Short Talk: Unique Response of Cancer- and Senescence-Resistant Rodent “Naked Mole-Rat” to Cellular Senescence Induction

11:30 AM—4:30 PM
On Own for Lunch

11:30 AM—1:00 PM
Poster Setup

Room 503
1:00—10:00 PM
Poster Viewing

Room 503
4:00—4:30 PM
Coffee Available

Foyer
4:30—6:30 PM
Stress, Damage and Epigenetic Changes
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Room 501+502
* Emi K. Nishimura, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan

Rochelle Buffenstein, Calico Life Sciences LLC, USA
Sustained Maintenance of Proteostasis in the Long-Lived Naked Mole-Rat

Jan H. J. Hoeijmakers, Erasmus MC, Netherlands
DNA Damage, Aging and Nutritional Interventions

Jing-Dong Jackie Han, Shanghai Institutes of Biological Sciences, China
Integrative Data Analysis for Development and Aging

6:30—7:30 PM
Social Hour with Lite Bites
No registration fees are used to fund alcohol served at this function.

Room 503
7:00—9:00 PM
Poster Session 3

Room 503

FRIDAY, MAY 19

7:30—8:30 AM
Breakfast

Individual Hotel
8:30—9:15 AM
Keynote Address
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Room 501+502
* Leonard P. Guarente, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA

Thomas A. Rando, Stanford University School of Medicine, USA
Epigenetic Regulation of Stem Cell Aging

9:15 AM—12:30 PM
Age-Associated Complications
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Room 501+502
* Satchidananda Panda, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, USA

Yousin Suh, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, USA
Enhancer Mechanisms in Human Aging and Aging-Related Disease

Coffee Break

Kazuo Tsubota, Keio University School of Medicine, Japan
Age-Associated Eye Diseases and their Treatment

Masashi Yanagisawa, University of Tsukuba, Japan
Towards the Mysteries of Sleep

Ana Maria Cuervo, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, USA
Selective autophagy and age-associated diseases

Liang Dai, L’Oreal Research and Innovation, Singapore
Short Talk: The Role of Pre-LaminA in Skin Aging

Lauren Tindale, BC Cancer Agency, Canada
Short Talk: Lipid and Alzheimer’s Disease Genes Associated with Healthy Aging and Longevity in Healthy Oldest-Old

12:30—2:00 PM
On Own for Lunch

2:00—4:00 PM
Workshop 3: Epigenetics and Stress Response

Room 501+502
* Jing-Dong Jackie Han, Shanghai Institutes of Biological Sciences, China

Clea Barcena, University of Oviedo, Spain
Methionine Restriction Extends Mouse Lifespan by Modulating Bile Acid Signaling

Chung-Yi Liang, National Yang-Ming University, Taiwan
Functional Regulation of the DAF-16/FoxO Transcription Factor by Acetylation in Stress Responses and Longevity

Nitish Mittal, Biozentrum, University of Basel, Switzerland
The Gcn4 Transcription Factor Reduces Protein Synthesis Capacity to Extend Lifespan

Claire H. Wilson, University of South Australia, Australia
Caspase-2, a Regulator of Metabolic and Stress Response Pathways during Aging

Harumi Fujita, Keio University School of Medicine, Japan
Genetic Characterization of a Patient with a Progeroid Phenotype and Mosaic Variegated Aneuploidy

Min-Hao Kuo, Michigan State University, USA
Intracellular Triacylglycerol Promotes Longevity Independently of Energy Expenditure

Parag Kundu, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
Gut Microbiome of Aging-Host: Friend or Foe?

4:00—4:30 PM
Coffee Available

Foyer
4:30—6:30 PM
Interventions for Aging and Longevity
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Room 501+502
* Masashi Yanagisawa, University of Tsukuba, Japan

Eisuke Nishida, Kyoto University, Japan
Life-Span Regulation by Environmental Stresses in C. elegans

Hideyuki Okano, Keio University School of Medicine, Japan
Preemptive Medicine for Dementia and Neurodegenerative Diseases using iPSC-Technologies and Genetically Modified Non-human Primates

Gary Krishnan, Eli Lilly and Company, USA
Short Talk: Changes in Human Skeletal Muscle Transcriptome after Exercise Provides a Guide-Post for the Identification of Novel Exercise Mimetic Therapies to Treat Aging-Related Loss in Muscle Function

Arya Biragyn, NIA, National Institutes of Health, USA
Short Talk: Aging Microbiota Change in Primates and Mice Converts Innate B1a Cells into Pathogenic 4BL Cells that Induce Cytolytic CD8+T Cells

6:30—6:45 PM
Meeting Wrap-Up: Outcomes and Future Directions (Organizers)
Meeting has ended...abstracts no longer viewable online.

Room 501+502
6:45—7:45 PM
Social Hour with Lite Bites
No registration fees are used to fund alcohol served at this function.

Room 503
7:45—8:45 PM
Entertainment
Entertainment is not subsidized by conference registration fees nor any U.S. federal government grants. Funding for this expense is provided by other revenue sources.

Room 503

SATURDAY, MAY 20

 
Departure


*Session Chair †Invited, not yet responded.



We gratefully acknowledge support for this conference from:


Directors' Fund


These generous unrestricted gifts allow our Directors to schedule meetings in a wide variety of important areas, many of which are in the early stages of research.

Click here to view all of the donors who support the Directors' Fund.



Keystone Symposia thanks our Sponsors for generously supporting this meeting:

Astellas Pharma Inc. Japanese Society of Anti-Aging Medicine
Journal of Molecular Cell Biology (JMCB) Nestlé Institute of Health Sciences

We gratefully acknowledge the generous grant for this conference provided by:


National Institutes of Health

Grant No. 1R13AG056065-01

Funding for this conference was made possible (in part) by AG056065-01 from the National Institutes of Health. The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services; nor does mention by trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.


We gratefully acknowledge additional support for this conference from:


FujiFilm
The Naito Foundation
The Uehara Memorial Foundation Zymo Research Corporation

Kowa Life Science Foundation
 

We gratefully acknowledge additional in-kind support for this conference from those foregoing speaker expense reimbursements:



Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research


We appreciate the organizations that provide Keystone Symposia with additional support, such as marketing and advertising:


Click here to view more of these organizations


Special thanks to the following for their support of Keystone Symposia initiatives to increase participation at this meeting by scientists from underrepresented backgrounds:


Click here to view more of these organizations


If your organization is interested in joining these entities in support of Keystone Symposia, please contact: Sarah Lavicka, Director of Development, Email: sarahl@keystonesymposia.org,
Phone:+1 970-262-2690

Click here for more information on Industry Support and Recognition Opportunities.

If you are interested in becoming an advertising/marketing in-kind partner, please contact:
Yvonne Psaila, Director, Marketing and Communications, Email: yvonnep@keystonesymposia.org,
Phone:+1 970-262-2676